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Holy crap, what a week its been. First off, plenty of kudos to the entire Blizzard team for what was a mostly problem free launch. I started playing early afternoon on the launch date and didn’t experience a single problem logging on to the game and playing. Most of the people I spoke to had the same experience. I don’t remember the Wrath of the Lich King launch going anywhere near as well. I’d also like to thank the good folks at Amazon for getting my collector’s edition to me first thing Tuesday morning.

My actual gaming experience has been nothing short of excellent. It took me less than a week to get from 80 – 85 and it didn’t feel the least bit like a grind. Aside from my many encounters with Horde gankers, which is to be expected playing on a pvp server, I don’t have a single negative thing to say about any of the zones I quested in or any of the dungeons I took part in. Mount Hyjal, Deepholm, and Twilight Highlands are all visually stunning. My personal favorite of the three was Hyjal. I’m a huge Nightelf fanboy and I thoroughly enjoyed geeking out at all the Nightelf lore getting tossed at you from all angles in the zone. I also really enjoyed all the cut scenes Blizzard added in each of the zones. I felt it gave you a chance to just sit back and appreciate the fruits of all your labors. I’m not going to spoil anything for all of you haven’t hit 85 yet, but the cut scene towards the end of the Twilight Highlands was pure freaking win. I’d put it right up there with the Wrathgate scene in terms of pure awesomeness.

The only bad things I have to say about the first week would hold true at the start of any expansion and for any game. Auction house prices are absolutely ridiculous, making leveling crafting professions damned expensive. This does mean however, that there are plenty of opportunities for gathers to make an absolute killing. I managed to turn a couple of hours farming Obsidium Ore during the week on my Death Knight into almost 6000 gold in profits. Had I spent more time farming and playing the auction house I very easily could have made double or triple that. Ganking was also absolutely crazy and continues to be so. If you play on a PvP server be prepared to either suck it up or take matters into your own hands. I preferred the second of the two options. My advice is to team up with a couple of guildies or put the word out in general chat that you’re looking to clear out the zone of unwanted members of the opposing faction. You’d surprised how effective you can be with just two or three of you working together to kill other players. Not only is it great fun if you’re into PvPing, but you’ll also get plenty of praise from members of your own faction for making their lives easier if just for the next hour or so.

So there’s my quick and dirty run down of the first week of Cataclysm. I hope y’all have been having just as much fun as I have. I can’t wait to try my hand at a few heroics here in the coming week and getting prepared for raiding.

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Man has it been a while. Sorry for not having posted in a while but work has been kicking my ass something fierce. We’re just over 2 weeks until Cataclysm hits and I don’t know about y’all but I’m very much looking forward to it. Doesn’t look like I’m going to meet my ultimate goal for Wrath, which was to down the Lich King, but I’ve very much enjoyed this expansion. A while ago I made a couple of post about leveling and instancing in WotLK but I never got around to talking about my favorite part of this expansion, raiding. I have a lot to say about the raids in Wrath, some good and some not so good, so I’m going to split this conversation up into a few parts to spare you all the giant wall of text. Today I’m going to talk about the first raiding tier.

I first started playing World of Warcraft midway through The Burning Crusade expansion. As a result, I was WAY behind on the progression scale once I finally hit max level. The guild I was in was never able to clear anything past Gruul’s Lair. We were able to get through the first three bosses in Zul’Aman before all the raids were nerfed into the ground. It wasn’t because of a lack of desire that we were never able to see higher end content, it was because of attrition to further progressed guilds. Try as we might, we could never quite sustain a full 25 man roster to progress past Gruul and into Serpentshrine Cavern. Two things stopped me from leaving my guild and trying to get a spot in a further progressed guild. First, I formed way too many friendships with people in my guild to just up and leave. Secondly, I played a Balance Druid and there was no way I was getting a raid spot as an oomkin. So I just stuck it out until Wrath.

The expansion put all guilds back on equal footing progression wise and also introduced 10 man raiding as a very viable option. Thanks to this, I was finally able to do some real progression raiding and loved it. Having never seen Naxxramas before, I was blown away by the raid. Each wing had a very unique feel to while still maintaining its overall fight against the scourge theme. I felt the difficulty, especially in 10 man was perfectly tuned for an entry level raid. Without trying for achievements, none of the bosses were overly difficult and each introduced mechanics that were needed to be understood by new raiders in order to be successful in future raids. I also found the instance to be very fun for the first few months of running through it. There were a few bosses that challenged your ability to coordinate your raiders and others where DPS could flex their muscles and fight for bragging rights. Many a fun time was had on Patchwerk where my fellow boomkins and I were constantly upstaging the mages and warlocks in the raid.

Obsidian Sanctum and Eye of Eternity where the other two raids that shipped with Wrath of the Lich King and both were drastically different from Naxx. Where Naxx was a 15 marathon of a raid, OS and Maly were one boss sprints. After having cleared Naxx and obtaining the key that unlocked the Eye of Eternity, it was very realistic for a group to clear both raid in one night. Obsidian Sanctum also introduced the concept of “hard modes” to raiding. By choosing whether or not to leave any drakes alive when engaging Sartharion, raiders could up the difficulty of the raid from delightfully easy (no drakes up) to “Oh dear gods why?!” (3 drakes up) to suit their tastes. I loved being able to dial up the difficulty of the raid and push myself harder as a raider, even if most of my guildmates at the time did not. Because of this, I found Obsidian Sanctum to be a very successful raid. Eye of Eternity on the other hand can go die in a fire. The idea behind the this instance was pretty cool. Take on the Aspect of Magic while riding on the back of a dragon? Who hasn’t wanted to kill something riding on a dragon? The execution of said idea missed its mark. The controls and abilities of the dragons felt clunky and they’re power didn’t scale with gear level of the rider. Once I completed the instance, I had very almost no reason to want to back in there.

Overall, I felt that Blizzard was largely successful with the first tier of raiding. It allowed novice raiders a good opportunity to get their feet wet in end game raiding while still providing ways for experienced raiders to challenge and push themselves. The encounter designers would take what they learned from these raids and craft what was one of the most widely loved raids in Ulduar.

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So, we’ve all had a couple of weeks now to play around with the new talents and abilities the patch has dropped in our laps. Let me just say this, Affliction is the freakin’ bee’s knees! Soul Swap is my new favorite spell. I didn’t think anything would overtake Seed of Corruption but I’ll be damned if I don’t love the instantly applying all my DoT’s on a new target. When I first looked at this spell, I figured it would only see situational use on trash mobs and in PvP. Thanks to the Soul Swap glyph, this spell is pure freakin win. For those of who don’t know what it does, the Soul Swap glyph allows you to transfer all your DoT’s onto a new target while still leaving the original ones on the target in exchange for a 10 second cool down on Soul Swap. I shed a tear when I first discovered the glyph.

Soul Swap isn’t the only new cool toy we got. We got a completely overhauled Soul Shard system. Gone are the days of carrying around 20 or more soul shards for all our spells. Now we have 3 soul shards for use primarily during combat. I’m not sure how it’d working out for the other specs, but I’m underwhelmed by this new mechanic for Affliction. There’s not really a whole lot for us to benefit from with this. Instant cast Soul Fire is nice when you’re on the move but chances are you’ll be using this time to reapply a DoT so it’s a situational ability. My favorite use for Soulburn is to enhance Seed of Corruption. It’s like Blizzard said to us affliction warlocks “yo we heard that you guys like DoT’s so we’re putting a DoT inside of your DoT’s to give you more DoT’s while you’re casting a DoT.” Gotta love instantly applying Corruption to every target in sight.

Our rotation remains pretty much the same, the main difference is that now Haunt is the main method for refreshing Corruption and not Shadow Bolt. Making sure we’re casting Haunt when it’s off cooldown is a bigger priority than it was before. Bane of Agony lasts longer so we’re having to reapply it less often. Aside from that, our rotation remains pretty much intact. All in all, I’ve been very happy with the changes Affliction has seen in the new patch.

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Like Sar, I have spent exactly zero seconds on the PTR so my Affliction spec comes with the same caveat.

Affliction Talent Tree

Doom and Gloom (2/2): Increases crit chance for one of our DoTs? Sure I’ll take it

Improved Life Tap (2/2): In a world where mana is not to be taken for granted, what’s not to like about getting more mana back from Life Tap?

Improved Corruption (3/3): Increased damage for our bread and butter DoT is very much a no brainer

Jinx (2/2): With Curse of Agony becoming Bane of Agony, it allows us to work a nice utility curse into our rotation. This talent allows us to cast to only once and affect all nearby mobs. Situational? Yes. Useful? I would say so.

Soul Siphon (2/2): More damage from our execute spell for each Affliction effect on the target makes me all warm and fuzzy

Siphon Life (2/2): Allows me to passively heal myself while I Life Tap my mana back. Pure win.

Cure of Exhaustion (0/1): Doubt this has any real use outside of PvP

Improved Fear (0/2): Once again, pretty much PvP only

Eradication (3/3): Anything to help reduce the cast times of Unstable Affliction and Shadow Bolt is ok by me

Improved Howl of Terror (0/2): More of a PvP talent in my opinion with little to offer in PvE

Soul Swap (1/1): I love the potential of this talent in PvP and the best thing about it is that it could be very useful in PvE as well. With more of a focus being put on CC, it’s possible we could be dpsing trash down one at a time and having the ability to instantly apply all our DoTs will be a huge DPS boost.

Shadow Embrace (3/3): Straight up damage increase to all of our DoT’s. Nothing fancy here just a nice meat and potatoes type talent.

Death’s Embrace (3/3): Does this mean we now channel Drain Life until 25% and spam Shadow Blots after wards? Way to turn my world upside down Blizz.

Nightfall (2/2): Instant cast Shadow Bolts are yummy.

Soulburn: Seed of Corruption (1/1): Seems like a pretty fun talent. Usefulness may be a bit limited but could be pretty strong in BG’s or while AoEing

Everlasting Affliction (3/3): Increased crit chance for 3 of our top abilities and free refreshes of Corruption.

Pandemic (2/2): Nothing wrong with lowering the Global Cooldown of our instant cast abilities and the refresh to Unstable Affliction is nice

Haunt (1/1): Always been a big fan of Haunt and don’t see anything to change my mind about it in Cataclysm.

A hint of Destruction

The thought of dipping into demonology never once crossed my mind.

Bane (3/3): Faster Shadow Bolt casts are lovely

Shadow and Flame (1/3): Nice little bump to the damage of Shadow Bolt and a chance for a debuff to be applied to the target.

Looking over the talent tree for the first time raised a few questions for me. Is Drain Life now the filler spell for Affliction? Should I now only use Shadow Bolt when the mob is below 25%? How difficult will it be to adjust to this?

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The reports of my demise have been greatly exaggerated. Ok, so maybe there haven’t been any reports on my demise but I have been suspiciously silent this past week. The reason for my absence is quite mundane; I just got hammered with a ton of work last week. Mainly this was due to me taking a day off at the end of the week before to go out of town. Silly of me trying to take a day off and you can rest assured that I won’t be making that mistake again. Today’s post will be a quick, short one just to get me back into the swing of things. Thursday I promise y’all a rich and meaty post full of delicious warlocky goodness.
The only news of interest I have for today is pretty sweet.

Level 80!

I’m finally level 80! I was able to unwind this weekend from my hellish week at work so I took the opportunity to power through the last few levels I needed to max out my lock. The quest that put me over the top was my jewelcrafting daily. Talk about killing two birds with one stone! The first thing I did once I hit 80, besides dance a little jig at my desk, was to start crafting out a bunch of gear. I made sure to have my jewelcrafting and tailor maxed out before I hit 80 so I could gear out Gingerlei much easier. Within an hour, and with the help of a guildie, Ginger was outfitted with her Merlin’s Robe, Bejeweled Wizard’s Bracers, Deathfrost Boots, and Leggins of Woven Death. Not a bad start if I do says so myself. By the end of the night, she had her first piece of T9 and a few other purples from heroics. My goal is to have her raid ready by our Thursday night guild alt run.

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I’ve forgotten how long it was between levels when you hit 70. Between 50 – 70 it was very easy for me to gain 2 or 3 levels per day. Now in Northrend I find myself going 2 or 3 days between leveling. I forgot how much Blizzard nerfed the experience requirements for all the pre-Wrath levels. However, I’m not really minding it all too much because questing through Northrend is pretty damn fun. Today I’m going to take a look back at the leveling experience and see how it compared to BC and Vanilla.

I absolutely hated leveling in Burning Crusade. Hellfire Peninsula was a barren waste land that sapped the energy right out of me. It felt like an absolute chore leveling through that area and the first time through almost ruined the game for me. I never really felt engaged at all while leveling and the constant abuse I got from max level Horde players did not help in the least. Hellfire being the only place for level 60 characters to quest made it a gankers paradise until the introduction of the Isle of Quel’Danas. Another chief complaint I heard from players who were around at the start of the expansion was that the huge volume of players each vying for the same quest mobs or quest items made leveling a cut throat experience. It was dog eat dog on the road to level 70.

The quest designers at Blizzard learned their lesson and Wrath of the Lich King brought with it to two unique starting zones. By not having the entire player base funneled into one starting area, the competition for quest mobs was drastically reduced which resulted in a much calmer leveling experience. The other benefit of having two starter zones was that if one of the zones was currently populated with griefers, you could make your way over to the other zone and continue with your leveling. Score a win here for Wrath.

My other chief complaint about leveling in BC is that I never really felt involved in the storyline. Aside from a handful of quests, it didn’t really seem as if I was taking the fight to the Burning Legion or to Illidan. It wasn’t until Shadowmoon Valley and the Akama quests that I even remember seeing anything about Illidan and by that point I was already close to level 70. Unlike in BC, the quest chains in Wrath got you involved with the main story lines right from the get go. In the Borean Tundra, one of the two starter zones, you get involved in a quest line that leads you face to face with the Lich King. By the end of the Thassarian quest chain in Borean, I was completely hooked. And it only got better from there. the pinnacle of questing in Wrath may have been the chain of events leading up to what unfolded at the Wrathgate. That was the first time I could honestly say I was blown away by an event in game. Personally, I was never bored while questing in Northrend nor did I ever find it to be a chore. Each new zone promised a new and exciting story arc with quest chains that helped build upon them. From the Worgen in Grizzly Hills to Freya in Sholazar Basin, there was always something new to explore.

For me, Wrath hit a home run in the leveling department. Some folks complained that they saw Arthas way too much and were kind of burnt out on him by the end of the expansion. I whole heatedly disagree. His presence and subsequent defeats made it feel as if I really were an important cog in the fight against the Scourge. And it was certainly a vast improvement over the invisible Illidan. The best part of leveling in Wrath however, was that it continued to improve the more we progressed into the expansion. Later patches would add Heirloom items that could be passed onto lower level characters to improve the early leveling experience and they would also introduce the Dungeon Finder tool, making it much simpler to find a group for an instance run. Overall, I was extremely happy with the changes Blizzard made to the leveling game in Wrath and I’m looking forward to what changes they have in store for us come Cataclysm.

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So late Tuesday afternoon, it finally happened. I reached my next major milestone on my journey to discover the ways of the Warlock. I finally hit level 70!

Gingerlei hits 70

Hooray for me! Looking back, I can honestly say that I’ve had a really good time leveling this character. I love this class and I’m really enjoying every minute of playing my little warlock. It’s to the point where I would almost rather give up raiding on my other toons to focus solely on leveling my Warlock. I must admit this is rather surprising for me since I have always considered myself in WoW to be a Boomkin before anything else. Now, realistically, I couldn’t give up raiding even if I wanted to. I’m the Raid Leader for my little 10 man guild and right now I’m in charge of training a bunch of new recruits and dragging them through ICC in the hopes of reforming a progression group for Cataclysm.

Don’t get me wrong, I still love my Druid. She has been my main for the entirety of my WoW career and may very well still be for Cata, but this whole Warlock thing is really giving me a reason to reconsider. I’ve been reading through a lot of the information coming out of the Beta and the PTR and I’m not digging what I’m seeing for Boomkins. I keep reminding myself that it’s still only Beta, and a lot could change between now and then, but the luster has come off a bit for me. Meanwhile, I’m absolutely loving the play style of Warlocks, specifically Affliction and the changes I’ve seen from the Beta have me even more excited about the class. If you’ve been through this type of thing before, I’d love to hear your story in the comments.

P.S. Seed of Corruption is the greatest spell ever! I can’t begin to describe the pure level of awesome this spell is and how giddy it makes me to seed spam my way to the top of the DPS meters on AOE trash pulls. Doing more damage than the rest of the group combined on trash is just pure freakin win!

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The end of Wrath is just about here and most of us are tying up a few loose ends in preparation for Cataclysm. For some this may be finishing off some last raid achievements and for others it could be getting an alt to 80 so that you can switch mains come the expansion. With the end of the expansion rapidly approaching, I thought it might be fun (if not entirely over done) to look back at Wrath of the Lich King from a couple of different angles and see what I did and did not like about it. Today, I’ll be taking a look at the new dungeons and that shipped with the expansion and at the change in philosophy they brought with them.

Anyone who played WoW during the Burning Crusades expansion should be very familiar with the bulk of instances we had to play with. From Hellfire Ramparts to Magister’s Terrace, I think it’s safe to assume we all spent a good deal of time in each and every one of those instances. In my opinion, it was probably too much time. I remember on more than one occasion spending upwards of two hours in any one BC instance due to the size and complexity of the trash mobs within. I absolutely dreaded running those dungeons and I was left with such a bad impression of them that I flat out refused to run a single one when I leveled my Death Knight through Outlands. Having to spend an hour in an instance carefully orchestrating trash pulls for little to no reward was not my idea of a good time. This is to say nothing of having to run an instance multiple times on regular mode to grind the faction reputation necessary to unlock heroic modes. Needless to say, instancing in Burning Crusades required a crazy amount of time commitment.

Wrath of the Lich King saw a totally different approach to dungeons. While at first, many of us were indeed taking the time to mark targets and organize crowd control, it would not be long before each instance would become an AOE pullfest that could be completed in under half an hour. Dungeons in Wrath were drastically smaller than the ones in BC. Even if a group were to take the time to organize crowd control, a Wrath instance could be completed in half the time of one in BC. For those of us with limited opportunities to play, this was a very welcome change. It became very possible for some folks to log on during their lunch breaks and crank out a quick five man dungeon. This also made it possible for small groups of friends to run multiple instances in one night and experience a variety of different environments.

This not to say that instancing in Wrath was not without its faults. As I alluded to earlier, once you got past a certain gear level there was very little thought involved in clearing a dungeon. Grab yourself an over geared tank, have him grab up every mob in sight, then fire up your AOE. Repeat a few more times and the dungeon is cleared. Many veterans were left wanting more of a challenge out of the dungeons and had to wait until patch 3.3 and the introduction of the Icecrown dungeons to get their fix. Wrath also brought us one of the most hated instances in the history of WoW with The Oculus. The Oculus was so hated in fact, that Blizzard had to introduce additional rewards at the end of the instance just to keep the majority of players from dropping the group should they have had the misfortune of being placed into it using the dungeon finder tool.

Give me the choice of which expansions dungeons to run and I’ll pick Wrath’s everyday of the week and twice on Sundays. Wrath had easily the most visually appealing dungeons in the game to date. I still get all wide eyed at all the beautiful Celtic and Norse imagery in the Utgarde Keep and Utgarde Pinnacle. The introduction of achievements gave me a reason to continue running the same dungeons over and over despite out gearing and not needing badges from them. Cataclysm looks to build on everything I feel Blizzard did right by dungeons and improve upon them. There have been numerous posts from the developers about toning down AOE and bringing back the crowd control element into dungeon runs. Should Blizzard be able to find the right balance between the strategy of Burning Crusades and the speed of Wrath of the Lich King, I would consider dungeons in Cataclysm to be a huge success.

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A few quick observations for you guys on this lovely, and I use that word loosely, Monday morning. The leveling grind from 50 – 70 has gone relatively quick. Much quicker than I remember the first two times I’ve done it. The dungeon finder has been an absolute wonder for leveling. From 50 to about 58 or so I would just pop into the queue and roam around Western or Eastern Plaguelands finishing up quests until it was time to hop into a dungeon. In my battlegroup the wait for a dungeon as DPS could take upwards of 30 minutes, but it’s not so bad when you’re actively doing something else. Taking the time to do quests between dungeons, I would average two or three dungeons per level.

I really enjoyed questing through both EPL and WPL. For me it was fun because you’re it’s the first chance you’re given to take the fight to the scourge. Also, it proved to be a very nice source for runecloth and allowed me to crank up my tailoring skill in a huge way. The first couple of times I leveled, I did the 55-60 grind in Silithus and I gotta say EPL and WPL was much more entertaining and felt a lot less soul crushing. Not to mention no having to listen to that awful buzzing noise was a very nice perk. There is also an interesting quest chain that begins with current scourge killing badass, Tirion Fordring. You can find him hanging out in Eastern Plaguelands near the river that marks the boundary between it and the Western Plaguelands. It’s a cool little look at the man who would someday hold the Ashbringer and lead the fight into Icecrown Citadel. Worth checking out if you’re in the area.

The dungeon finder tool provided a nice little break from all the questing and was a fantastic source of experience. One thing I noticed in a lot of these dungeons is the rather large quantity of idiotic Deathknight tanks. I understand the allure of the class being that I have one myself. The thing that really drew me to it was being able to start at 58 and skip that horrific leveling grind. And it’s really great that you can tank on your new DK and get instant queues in the dungeon finder. But is it really THAT hard to take 10 minutes before you queue for a dungeon to research a proper spec for your Death Knight? Yes all three talent trees make for very viable tanks, but there are key talents in each tree that you need to pick up to be a successful tank. Please don’t be that guy and queue as a tank in your DPS spec. You’ll make everyone’s lives that much simpler if you just invest a few minutes of time into picking up a proper tanking spec. Even if you can’t be bothered to take an honest to goodness tanking spec, for the love of my freaking sanity, make sure you’re at least in FROST PRESENCE.

One last thing I discovered this weekend while leveling is that the Alterac Valley Battleground Weekend freaking rocks. Even if you don’t really dig PVP, you really should give it a try. You will gain obscene amounts of experience during AV. All it takes is a few victories per level to gain you a level and since the queue is relatively short due to the large amount of people taking part coupled with the fact that it’s a 40 man BG you could easily gain a couple of levels an hour. It’s also a good opportunity to try out some PVP and get a feel for it. I find AV to be the easiest on folks new to PVP since you can just move with the pack and not feel as if you’re being too big of a drag on the team for not really knowing what you’re doing. Definitely easier to hide in the crowd in AV as opposed to say Warsong Gulch.

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In my quest to get my warlock to 80, I had the distinct pleasure of spending a lot of time leveling through Stranglethorn Vale. A lot of people who play on PvP servers are probably calling me crazy right now, and they’re probably right, however it is one of my favorite zones in all of WoW. The scenery is absolutely gorgeous and there is a good variety of quests to keep you entertained. Best of all, most of the quests keep you firmly in the zone. The biggest drawback to questing in Stranglethorn, especially on PvP servers, is the near constant threat of being ganked.

Personally, I have never understood the appeal of ganking. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy some good PvP as much as the next guy but that’s just it. I enjoy GOOD PvP. I like the idea of going up against other players of your level and matching wits and blades in open combat. I like knowing that if I’m not at the top of game there is a very real chance that I will get my ass handed to me. It’s that knowing that drives me to improve and excel as a PvPer. Ganking doesn’t provide any of that. Ganking is the absolute antithesis of that.

For those of you unfamiliar with the term, ganking is the act of killing another player multiple levels below your own. This is a very popular past time for a lot of players at max level and many enjoy targeting players between levels 20 – 40. Often times these max level characters will kill their prey in just one attack. Here is where my analogy of squishing a bug comes into play. Most people will kill bug that is annoying them without thinking. It’s quick and effortless to kill a bug. A lot of us don’t feel any remorse for doing, heck we usually don’t feel anything at all. It’s just something you do and just as quickly forget about it.

Gankers are different. Gankers are that mean little kid, sitting on the sidewalk with a magnifying glass burning ants alive. They relish in playing God over these little creatures and delight in watching them burn. In game, they’re the max level characters laying siege to Southshore or Stranglethorn for no other reason than that they enjoy lording over those who can’t do anything about it. Most days, I couldn’t go an hour in Stranglethorn on my warlock without getting wailed on by someone with too much time on their hands and too little to do.

Most times you just have to shrug it off and keep going on about your business. But sometimes, you’ll get that one guy who just manages to push your buttons and drive you absolutely bonkers. It was a mage oddly enough that finally made me snap. I was mounted up, making my way over to the Rebel Camp to turn in some quests when I passed the mage on the road. He was on foot helping a buddy of his kill some trolls for another quest as I passed. I kept on, thinking I was in the clear when I took a frostbolt to the back and died instantly. This guy saw me, mounted up, and followed me for a good minute or so until he caught up just so he could kill me. That’s like you walking down the street and seeing lady bug on the sidewalk across the street then deciding to go dash across the street just to stomp it. What was the point? What sick feeling of exhilaration could you possibly get from that? This is what was going through my head after he killed me and I just snapped. I immediately logged off and hopped onto my Death Knight.

My Death Knight is level 80 and fully geared in Vengeful and Wrathful PvP gear. I’m not the greatest PvPer. I’ll never see the 2000+ arena bracket but I can more than hold my own in a fight. I immediately flew down to Stranglethorn and began to hunt that idiot mage down. Long story short, I found the mage and made his life miserable for a good 30 minutes. I corpse camped him all the way to the Horde base in the area and then proceeded to kill every living Horde creature in sight. So now I pose the question to you dear readers. Do you have any good ganking stories from either side of the fence?

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